● Please make sure your dog behaves appropriately. This includes: being aware of what your dog is doing at all times and making sure interactions are appropriate between dogs in the group (meaning dogs are not bullying other dogs, not repeatedly harassing other dogs who are not into playing, etc.). “Arguments” between dogs happen occasionally, but let’s be proactive and try to prevent any problems before they occur as much as we can. Some dogs naturally like to "play-fight" and that's okay as long as both dogs are willing! Unwelcome/unprovoked negative interaction is not. Your meetup organizer, Jodi Cassell is a fear free/positive reinforcement dog trainer, so if you are seeing any issues or have questions, please feel free to contact me.
hr Dio potpodručja koje leži između južne obale Quebeca od krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebec do Pointe-des-Montsa i crte opisane kako slijedi: započinje na Pointe-des-Montsu, potom ravno prema istoku do točke na 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 64°40′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u smjeru jug-jugoistok do točke na 47°50′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom ravno prema sjeveru do točke at 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u sjeveroistočnom smjeru do krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebeca.
en That portion of the sub-area lying between the south coast of Quebec from the terminus of the Labrador-Quebec boundary to Pointe-des-Monts and a line described as follows: beginning at Pointe-des-Monts, thence due east to a point at 49°25′ north latitude, 64°40′ west longitude, thence along a rhumb line in an east-south-easterly direction to a point at 47°50′ north latitude, 60°00′ west longitude, thence due north to a point at 49°25′ north latitude, 60°00′ west longitude, thence along a rhumb line in a north-easterly direction to the terminus of the Labrador-Quebec boundary.
There are two types of Labradors, the English Labrador and the American Labrador. The English bred Lab comes from English bred stock. Its general appearance is different than the American bred Lab. The English bred Labs are heavier, thicker and blockier. The American bred Lab comes from American bred stock and is tall and lanky. The double coat is smooth and does not have any waves. Coat colors come in solid black, yellow or chocolate. There is also said to be a rare silver or gray color that is referred to by the AKC as a shade of chocolate. This color is controversial and some claim it is a Weimaraner cross, while others say it is a true mutation. The head of the Labrador is broad with a moderate stop. The nose is thick, black on black and yellow dogs and brown on chocolate dogs. The nose color often fades and is not considered a fault in the show ring. The teeth should meet in a scissors or level bite. The muzzle is fairly wide. The neck is proportionately wide and powerful. The body is slightly longer than tall. The short, hard coat is easy to care for and water-resistant. The medium-sized eyes are set well apart. Eye color should be brown in yellow and black dogs and hazel or brown in chocolate dogs. Some Labs can also have green or greenish-yellow eyes. In silver dogs the eye color is usually gray. The eye rims are black in yellow and black dogs and brown in chocolate dogs. The ears are medium in size, hanging down and pendant in shape. The otter tail is thick at the base, gradually tapering towards the tip. It is completely covered with short hair, with no feathering. The feet are strong and compact with webbed feet which aid the dog in swimming.

From Marcy's foster mom – she’s an absolute sweetheart.  She was surrendered to a local shelter after getting out of the backyard with her dog buddy.  She hasn't tried to escape while with here with us.  I do think she was kept outside quite a bit so we’ve had some house training to do but we are making progress there.  We crate her at night and she goes in easily and is quiet all night.  Daisy is fine on walks and getting better each time.  She rides great in the car though I have the feeling she hasn’t had many car rides.       
hr Dio potpodručja koje leži između obale Newfoundlanda od Cape Baulda do Cape Raya i crte opisane kako slijedi: započinje na Cape Bauldu, potom ravno prema sjeveru na paralelu 52°15′ sjeverne geografske širine, potom ravno prema zapadu do obale Labradora, potom uzduž obale Labradora do krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebec, potom uzduž loksodrome u jugozapadnom smjeru do točke 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom ravno prema jugu do točke 47°50′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u jugoistočnom smjeru do točke na kojoj granica potpodručja 3. presijeca ravnu crtu koja spaja Cape North, Nova Škotska, s Cape Rayom, Newfoundland, potom do Cape Raya, Newfoundland.
In the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the Labrador's breed club have set the breed standard to accommodate the field-bred Labrador somewhat. For instance, the AKC withers-height standards allow conformation dogs to be slightly taller than the equivalent British standard.[45] However, dual champions, or dogs that excel in both the field and the show ring, are becoming more unusual.[46]
The physical and temperamental breed traits, so familiar today to millions of devotees around the world, recall the Lab’s original purpose. A short, dense, weather-resistant coat was preferred because during a Canadian winter longhaired retrievers would be encrusted with ice when coming out of the water. In its ancestral homeland, a Lab would be assigned to a fishing boat to retrieve the fish that came off the trawl. Accordingly, in addition to having natural instincts as a retriever, the dog required a coat suited to the icy waters of the North Atlantic.
Shyla is a sweet Lab who is always happy to see her people. She is calm, potty trained, and likes to sleep on her bed! She enjoys lots of toys, playing fetch, and going on walks. She followed her foster mama upstairs twice and could not get down so stairs are going to be something she has to learn and get comfortable with or she will prefer her owner live on the first floor. Shyla is gorgeous and very expressive and will be fine with small kids. She says, “pick me! Pick Me!” and there is no reason why you wouldn't!!!
"Molly Girl at 2 months—Molly is every bit chocolate Lab, but with none of the horror stories I was warned of! She is not super high energy, probably due in part to the daily exercise I make sure she gets. She is eager to please and extremely loyal. She greets everyone with a wag of the tail and loves to be loved on! As with any dog, consistency is important when training, and thanks to that, and dog parks, Molly is the perfect dog:)"
The Labrador Retriever is the traditional waterdog of Newfoundland, long employed as a duck retriever and fisherman’s mate. The breed began its steady climb to supreme popularity in the early 1800s, when Labs were spotted by English nobles visiting Canada. These sporting earls and lords returned to England with fine specimens of “Labrador dogs.” (Exactly how these dogs of Newfoundland became associated with Labrador is unclear, but the name stuck.) During the latter half of the 19th century, British breeders refined and standardized the breed.
The Vietnam War is the only war in American history in which US war dogs, which were officially classified by the military as "military working dogs," were not allowed to officially return home after the war.[88] Classified as expendable equipment, of the approximate 4,000 US K-9s deployed to the Vietnam War, it is estimated that only about 200 US war dogs survived Vietnam to be put into service at other outposts stationed overseas.[89] Aside from these 200 or so, the remaining canines who were not killed in action were either euthanised or left behind.[90]
The Labrador is a moderate dog, not extreme in any way. It is square or slightly longer than tall, of fairly large bone and substance. The breed’s broad head and strong jaws enabled the dog to carry the largest game birds, such as Canada geese. A heavy body and strong legs enable the dog to swim and run powerfully. The coat, which is short, straight, and dense with a soft undercoat, is weatherproof and helps to protect it from icy waters. The Lab is a working retriever and possesses style without over-refinement, and substance without clumsiness.
The Labrador should be short-coupled, with good spring of ribs tapering to a moderately wide chest. The Labrador should not be narrow chested; giving the appearance of hollowness between the front legs, nor should it have a wide spreading, bulldog-like front. Correct chest conformation will result in tapering between the front legs that allows unrestricted forelimb movement. Chest breadth that is either too wide or too narrow for efficient movement and stamina is incorrect. Slab-sided individuals are not typical of the breed; equally objectionable are rotund or barrel chested specimens. The underline is almost straight, with little or no tuck-up in mature animals. Loins should be short, wide and strong; extending to well developed, powerful hindquarters. When viewed from the side, the Labrador Retriever shows a well-developed, but not exaggerated forechest.
Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise -- especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, such as herding or hunting. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility.
Maggie May the chocolate Labrador Retriever at 4 years old—"This is my Valentine Puppy, Maggie May. She was born in 2010 on February 14, Valentine's Day, which is funny because she is a chocolate labby:) I got Maggie in the spring of 2010. She was 4 1/2 months old. And totally crazy. For the first few months I had her, I had a tough-love relationship with her. Because she was pretty much out of control, along with being a very dominate puppy, I had to make sure from the beginning that she knew that I was the pack boss. As she got older she also showed some signs of aggression to dogs and people outside of our pack (family). I did not mind the aggression very much, as people don't expect Labs to be aggressive and that was good security thing to me, but I had to make sure that she knew that when I said "Stop it", "No", or "Knock it off", she would immediately cease her barking and/or growling. Maggie took to training like a pro. She loved to "work", as I called it. Her attention and focus on me was, and still is, out of this world. When she is playing with her doggie friends, I can call her out and she will practically fly to me, completely forgetting the other dogs and instead focusing on me. Her focus on me was so great that she was off leash trustworthy in nearly any situation by 11 months. Now at almost 5 years old, she is perfect. It takes a lot to get a dog close to perfection, and Maggie is as close to it as a dog can get in my opinion. Maggie has 3 canine siblings: Sugar, a 14 year old Labrador/Golden Retriever mix, is her best friend. Angus (3 year old mix breed) and Tippy (1 year old Pit Bull/Corgi) are her partners in crime. I call them The Three Hoods."
My name is Tin Top and I am a truly amazing dog! My life kind of is like one of those country songs that starts out sad and then ends up happy. My sad start was being found on a rural rode with a gunshot wound in my shoulder. It shattered my front leg, so the amazing vet and his team had to remove it. But then they worked with me and helped me learn to walk on three legs. Cool huh? Soon a foster for DFW Lab Rescue came and took me to his home. I get lots of food (I was very, very, skinny), a nice warm cozy bed and tons of love from my foster parents. There are two foster lab brothers that I like but I am not really into playing with them.

Labrador je veoma aktivan pas koji zahteva svakodnevnu fizičku aktivnost u koju se ubrajaju šetnja, trčanje, donošenje plena i kad god je to moguće - plivanje. Veoma su alavi i imaju izraženu potrebu za žvakanjem. Probaće da pojede sve što mu je dostupno i izgleda interesantno. U nedostatku fizičke aktivnosti i usled nepravilne ishrane može postati gojazan. Gusta dlaka labradora lako se održava. Preporučljivo je četkanje jednom nedeljno, u periodu linjanja i češće. Psi ove rase skloni su srčanim oboljenjima, displaziji kukova i lakta. Ređe obolevaju od dijabetesa i katarekte. Prosečan životni vek labradora je 10 do 12 godina.


The Lab’s thick, tapering tail—an “otter tail,” it’s called— serves as a powerful rudder, constantly moving back and forth as the dog swims and aids the dog in turning. As for the breed’s characteristic temperament, it is as much a hallmark of the breed as the otter tail. “The ideal disposition is one of a kindly, outgoing, tractable nature; eager to please and nonagressive towards man or animal,” the breed standard says. “The Labrador has much that appeals to people; his gentle ways, intelligence and adaptability make him an ideal dog.” When defining a Lab’s primary attributes, the most important might be temperament since his utility depends on his disposition. “If a dog does not possess true breed temperament,” wrote a noted dog judge, “he is not a Labrador.”
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