hr Dio potpodručja koje leži između južne obale Quebeca od krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebec do Pointe-des-Montsa i crte opisane kako slijedi: započinje na Pointe-des-Montsu, potom ravno prema istoku do točke na 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 64°40′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u smjeru jug-jugoistok do točke na 47°50′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom ravno prema sjeveru do točke at 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u sjeveroistočnom smjeru do krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebeca.
The Vietnam War is the only war in American history in which US war dogs, which were officially classified by the military as "military working dogs," were not allowed to officially return home after the war.[88] Classified as expendable equipment, of the approximate 4,000 US K-9s deployed to the Vietnam War, it is estimated that only about 200 US war dogs survived Vietnam to be put into service at other outposts stationed overseas.[89] Aside from these 200 or so, the remaining canines who were not killed in action were either euthanised or left behind.[90]
Endal, a service dog[99] in Britain. Among other distinctions, "the most decorated dog in the world" (including "Dog of the Millennium"[100] and the PDSA's Gold Medal for Animal Gallantry and Devotion to Duty),[101] the first dog to ride on the London Eye and the first dog known to work a 'chip and pin' ATM card. By Endal's death in March 2009, he and his owner/handler Allen Parton had been filmed almost 350 times by crews from several countries, and a film of a year in Endal's life was in production.[102][103]
The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.
Labradori su veoma aktivni i uvek spremni za igru. Vole da trče za loptom, granom ili frizbijem i da stalno nose i žvaću nešto u ustima. Dokazano je čak da su labradori toliko pažljivi i nežni da mogu u ustima da nose jaje i da ga ne slome. Često vole da izvode razne ludorije samo da bi nas oraspoložili i nasmejali. Zahtevaju dosta pažnje i biće tužni ako se osete zapostavljenima. Zbog svog odličnog njuha, brzine, atletske građe i poslušnosti, labradori se često koriste i u policiji, za otkrivanje droge, lopova ili terorista. Oni su i odlični lovački psi, a najčešće love divljač sa željom da obraduju svog gospodara.
Lazy snowy days are perfect for curling up with a furbaby and getting lost in a good book. Get a book-loving dog mama "The Dharma of Dogs: Our Best Friends as Spiritual Teachers" by Tami Simon. This book talks about how our furry friends teach us to love unconditionally , face our fears and more. Dog moms will enjoy exploring their deep appreciation for their pup with this book.
The Labrador should be short-coupled, with good spring of ribs tapering to a moderately wide chest. The Labrador should not be narrow chested; giving the appearance of hollowness between the front legs, nor should it have a wide spreading, bulldog-like front. Correct chest conformation will result in tapering between the front legs that allows unrestricted forelimb movement. Chest breadth that is either too wide or too narrow for efficient movement and stamina is incorrect. Slab-sided individuals are not typical of the breed; equally objectionable are rotund or barrel chested specimens. The underline is almost straight, with little or no tuck-up in mature animals. Loins should be short, wide and strong; extending to well developed, powerful hindquarters. When viewed from the side, the Labrador Retriever shows a well-developed, but not exaggerated forechest.
"We watch The Dog Whisperer frequently, and we know what he means when he says to pick the pup out of the litter that is the most laid back. Most people go and pick out a dog based on their playful attitude because if a pup runs up to them they think the pup "chose them" when really it is just probably going to be a more challenging, hyper pup. We know this information now, but we did not know it when we went to get Bruno (or when we picked out our first two dogs), however he was the last male puppy left so we did not have a choice. I asked my husband why he thought Bruno was the last male left out of the litter and we later realized it was probably because he did not come leaping and bounding up to the other callers. The people that owned the pups had to go pick him up and bring him to us because he just sat at a distance observing the activity. When we first brought him home he went and sat in the corner all by himself after allowing the other dogs to greet him. We thought it was because he was so young and he was in a new environment. As the weeks passed Bruno was easily housetrained, never chewed anything up, and never "got in our face" for attention as the other dogs that we have liked to do. To this day if he wants attention he will just come and lie at our feet or sit by our side calmly. If we do not acknowledge his presence he will go lie by the door. When we took Bruno for his first set of shots, the vet said that he was extremely calm for a Lab puppy and said that he "was 1 in 100." Bruno will be 1 year old in January and we still have one of the best behaved dogs in the world with him."
In his book Excursions in and About Newfoundland During the Years 1839 and 1840,[19] the geologist Joseph Beete Jukes describes the St. John's water dog. "A thin, short-haired, black dog came off-shore to us to-day. The animal was of a breed very different from what we understand by the term Newfoundland dog in England. He had a thin, tapering snout, a long thin tail, and rather thin, but powerful legs, with a lank body, – the hair short and smooth." wrote Jukes. "These are the most abundant dogs in the country...They are no means handsome, but are generally more intelligent and useful than the others...I observed he once or twice put his foot in the water and paddled it about. This foot was white, and Harvey said he did it to "toil" or entice the fish. The whole proceeding struck me as remarkable, more especially as they said he had never been taught anything of the kind."
The original Labradors were all-purpose water dogs originating in Newfoundland, not Labrador. Not only did the breed not originate in Labrador, but it also was not originally called the Labrador Retriever. The Newfoundland of the early 1800s came in different sizes, one of which was the “Lesser” or “St. John’s” Newfoundland—the earliest incarnation of the Labrador. These dogs—medium-sized black dogs with close hair—not only retrieved game but also retrieved fish, pulled small fishing boats through icy water, and helped the fisherman in any task involving swimming. Eventually the breed died out in Newfoundland in large part because of a heavy dog tax. However, a core of Labradors had been taken to England in the early 1800s, and it is from these dogs, along with crosses to other retrievers, that the breed continued. It was also in England that the breed earned its reputation as an extraordinary retriever of upland game. Initially black labs were favored over yellow or chocolate colors. By the early 1900s, the other colors had become more accepted.  The breed was recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1903 and by the AKC in 1917. The popularity of this breed has grown steadily until the Labrador Retriever became the most popular breed in America in 1991 and remains so today.
If you’re on our site, chances are that you have a fondness for dogs, and you probably know other dog lovers. With our large selection of dog books and gifts for dog lovers, there’s no excuse for not finding a doggie-themed present for the next birthday or special occasion. Of course, you don’t even need a particular reason to send dog lover gifts to friends and family. Put your dog pride on display with decals for your car, laptop or fridge that have interesting and funny sayings about pets. There are also magnets that you can attach to your car and easily remove, and they’re great as gifts for dog lovers. Choose from bone-shaped magnets that exclaim things like, “I Love My Mutt” or “Bad to the Bone.” If you’re going for a funnier vibe, you can get “The World Does Revolve Around My Dog” or “I Kiss My Dog on the Lips.” Anyone waiting at a light behind you is sure to get a chuckle. Bookworms (whether that’s you or a friend) will enjoy our “pet library” that has dog books of all kinds. Even if you’re not so into books, you might find a great pet book that gives you training tips, grooming guides, potty training steps or breed information. We also have pet book memoirs, celebrity dog books, lighthearted tales about life with dogs, and emotional accounts of dogs overcoming the odds. You can pick out dog décor items to fill your home with pet happiness, including dog picture frames to show off your fur baby, wall art and pup-themed doormats. Or send dog lover gifts to friends and family as a nice surprise. We’ve got tons of pet parent favorites—just have a look, and you’re sure to find something that catches your eye.

Zanjeer ("Chain", or "Shackles"), a detection dog who detected arms and ammunition used in the 1993 Mumbai (Bombay) serial explosions. During his service, he helped recover 57 country-made bombs, 175 petrol bombs, 11 military grade armaments, 242 grenades and 600 detonators. His biggest contribution to the police force and the city was the detection of 3,329 kg of RDX. He also helped detect 18 Type 56 rifles and five 9mm pistols.
The Lab’s thick, tapering tail—an “otter tail,” it’s called— serves as a powerful rudder, constantly moving back and forth as the dog swims and aids the dog in turning. As for the breed’s characteristic temperament, it is as much a hallmark of the breed as the otter tail. “The ideal disposition is one of a kindly, outgoing, tractable nature; eager to please and nonagressive towards man or animal,” the breed standard says. “The Labrador has much that appeals to people; his gentle ways, intelligence and adaptability make him an ideal dog.” When defining a Lab’s primary attributes, the most important might be temperament since his utility depends on his disposition. “If a dog does not possess true breed temperament,” wrote a noted dog judge, “he is not a Labrador.” 
×