In the early years of the breed through to the mid-20th century, Labradors of a shade we would now call "yellow" were in fact a dark, almost butterscotch, colour (visible in early yellow Labrador photographs). The shade was known as "Golden" until required to be changed by the UK Kennel Club, on the grounds that "Gold" was not actually a colour. Over the 20th century a preference for far lighter shades of yellow through to cream prevailed; until today most yellow Labradors are of this shade. Also fawn has been a common colour in the yellow lab variety.[25]


In the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the Labrador's breed club have set the breed standard to accommodate the field-bred Labrador somewhat. For instance, the AKC withers-height standards allow conformation dogs to be slightly taller than the equivalent British standard.[45] However, dual champions, or dogs that excel in both the field and the show ring, are becoming more unusual.[46]
Lawyer Corg doing Lawyer Corg things. If you’re injured and don’t know who to call, call Lawyer Corg. If you have a claim that you need to file, call Lawyer Corg. He’s here FOR YOU. And while this paw-torney at law may think the case looks black and white, it isn’t because that’s the only way he sees. It’s a myth that dogs only see in black and white.
Does your dog know her name? Or perhaps, like this dog, she thinks it is: “Stop That” or “Get Back Here.” Sometimes, our dogs can have a mischievous streak . . . and we wonder if they ever get confused about what exactly their names are. While people can train dogs to do incredible things, we can still be curious about what they hear when we talk to them. Do they really understand? Or do they just hear a bunch of gibberish?!
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Labradors as a breed are curious and exploratory and love company, following both people and interesting scents for food, attention, and novelty value. In this way, they can often "vanish" or otherwise become separated from their owners with little fanfare.[49] As a breed they are highly intelligent and capable of intense single-mindedness and focus if motivated or their interest is caught. Therefore, with the right conditions and stimuli, a bored Labrador could "turn into an escape artist par excellence".[15][50] Many dogs are also stolen.[51] Because of their curious nature and ability to "vanish," along with the risk of being stolen, a number of dog clubs and rescue organisations (including the UK's Kennel Club) consider it good practice that Labradors be microchipped, with the owner's name and address also on their collar and tags.[49][52]

U knjizi "Kompletan labrador retriver" iz 1964. godine, autorka Helen Varvik je zapisala: "Labrador retriver je po svom dobroćudnom karakteru jedan od milion". Ova izjava ne može biti bliža istini. Prvobitno razvijan kao lovački pas ili "gun dog", labrador se danas smatra za idealnog psa porodice koja živi u predgrađu, savršen za decu, pas kome nije potrebno mnogo prostora za vežbu i koji će možda u želji da vidi svoje ljude obarati stvari mahanjem repa.

Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies. If they don't get the mental stimulation they need, they'll make their own work -- usually with projects you won't like, such as digging and chewing. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue.


In the 1830s, the 10th Earl of Home and his nephews the 5th Duke of Buccleuch and Lord John Scott,[13][14] had imported progenitors of the breed from Newfoundland to Europe for use as gundogs. Another early advocate of these Newfoundland dogs, or Labrador Retrievers as they later became known, was the 2nd Earl of Malmesbury who bred them for their expertise in waterfowling.[13][14]
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