I bought this for my mom last year and it's held up nicely since then. From what I recall, it arrived on or before the estimated shipping date and in good condition. It has survived countless rounds in the dishwasher and there has been absolutely no problem with the lettering or the mug itself. As for size, it can comfortably hold about 10 ounces of liquid
In this guide, we've included the best dog gifts of 2018 for all sizes and personalities, from classic chew toys to unexpected treats your pooch will adore. Many of these gifts range vastly in prices to accommodate any budget as well. So, let's start celebrating the holiday season with this guide, and get ready to watch your furbaby's eyes light up with excitement!

If you have a “cold-weather” breed, like a Samoyed, Siberian Husky, or Alaskan Malamute, you’ll know that their cold is not the same as your cold. It’s freezing outside, snowing like crazy, and you just want to sit inside with a cup of hot cocoa. Not these dogs, though! They are perfectly content to romp around in the snow and enjoy the winter weather. You can take the Sammy out of the Arctic, but you can’t take the Arctic out of the Sammy.

PennHIP 0.38; CERF: Clear. PRA: Clear. EIC: Clear. CNM: Clear. Congenital Cardiac: Clear. “Masha” is daughter of CH Poplar Forest Play it Again Sam CD RE MH x Chilbrook Raven Spirit RN, and granddaughter of U-ROG, U-ROC, URX(2), U-CD, HRCH, GRCH Chilbrook Lone Ranger, CD, RE, SH, WC, CGC . Masha exemplify the best qualities of 43 years of selective breeding under the purposeful planning of Debby Kay, author of the Labradors Breeders Handbook.
Kate Perry, dog trainer and author of Training for Both Ends of the Dog Leash, likes to give “practical items that help stimulate the dogs mind and help owners have a better relationship with their dogs.” One of her favorite interactive treat toys for pups is the Busy Buddy Twist and Treat, which keeps dogs working for their food. “Great as a gift for new dog owners, and great for training a dog to work for their food.”

The lovable Lab needs to be around his family, and is definitely not a backyard dog. If he's left alone for too long, he'll probably tarnish his saintly reputation: A lonely, bored Lab is apt to dig, chew, or find other destructive outlets for his energy. Labs show some variation in their activity levels, but all of them need activity, both physical and mental. Daily 30-minute walks, a romp at the dog park, or a game of fetch, are a few ways to help your Lab burn off energy. However, a puppy should not be taken for too long walks and should play for a few minutes at a time. Labrador Retrievers are considered "workaholics," and will exhaust themselves. It is up to you to end play and training sessions. Labs have such good reputations that some owners think they don't need training. That's a big mistake. Without training, a rambunctious Lab puppy will soon grow to be a very large, rowdy dog. Luckily, Labs take to training well — in fact, they often excel in obedience competitions. Start with puppy kindergarten, which not only teaches your pup good canine manners, but helps him learn how to be comfortable around other dogs and people. Look for a class that uses positive training methods that reward the dog for getting it right, rather than punishing him for getting it wrong. You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Lab puppy. Don't let your Lab puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement until he's at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility, with its one-inch jumps. Like all retrievers, the Lab is mouthy, and he's happiest when he has something, anything, to carry in his mouth. He's also a chewer, so be sure to keep sturdy toys available all the time — unless you want your couch chewed up. And when you leave the house, it's wise to keep your Lab in a crate or kennel so he's can't get himself into trouble chewing things he shouldn't.
Does the dog mom in your life take her furbaby everywhere? If so, it might be time to treat her and her pooch to a high-quality pet carrier so she can tote her pup safely and comfortably when she's in a rush. Sleepypod Atom is a fashionable and functional pet carrier , crash-tested for safety and featuring a comfortable padded shoulder strap for the fur mama, as well as a removable plush bedding for the pup inside.
While individual dogs may vary, in general show-bred Labradors are heavier built, slightly shorter-bodied, and have a thicker coat and tail. Field Labradors are generally longer-legged, lighter, and more lithe in build, making them agile. In the head, show Labradors tend to have broader heads, better defined stops, and more powerful necks, while field Labradors have lighter and slightly narrower heads with longer muzzles.[42][43] Field-bred Labradors are commonly higher energy and more high-strung compared to the Labrador bred for conformation showing while conformation breeds are calmer in energy, and as a consequence may be more suited to working relationships than being a "family pet".[42][43] Some breeders, especially those specialising in the field type, feel that breed shows do not adequately recognise their type of dog, leading to occasional debate regarding officially splitting the breed into subtypes.[44]
hr Dio potpodručja koje leži između južne obale Quebeca od krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebec do Pointe-des-Montsa i crte opisane kako slijedi: započinje na Pointe-des-Montsu, potom ravno prema istoku do točke na 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 64°40′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u smjeru jug-jugoistok do točke na 47°50′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom ravno prema sjeveru do točke at 49°25′ sjeverne geografske širine, 60°00′ zapadne geografske dužine, potom uzduž loksodrome u sjeveroistočnom smjeru do krajnjeg završetka granice Labrador-Quebeca.
We know, we know, not necessarily a fun-loving gift, but hear us out. This is pretty much a carpet cleaner for your dog. All you have to do is put in their no-rinse dog shampoo and water, and you can basically clean a stinky dog in the living room. Which makes it perfect for the dog parent in your life that has a dog that’s hard to get into the tub.
Size: Labradors are a medium-large breed. They should be as long from the withers to the base of the tail as they are from the floor to the withers. The AKC standard includes an ideal weight for males of 65–80 lb (29–36 kg) and for females as 55–70 lb (25–32 kg).[28] The guidelines for height vary between the AKC, which gives 22.5 to 24.5 inches (57 to 62 cm) for males and 21.5 to 23.5 inches (55 to 60 cm) for females,[28] The Kennel Club which advises that males should be 56 to 57 centimetres (22 to 22 in) with females between 55 to 56 centimetres (22 to 22 in),[30] and the FCI which quotes a range of 56 to 57 centimetres (22 to 22 in) for males with females ideal at 54 to 56 centimetres (21 to 22 in).[31]
Some breeds sound off more often than others. When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often. If you're considering a hound, would you find their trademark howls musical or maddening? If you're considering a watchdog, will a city full of suspicious "strangers" put him on permanent alert? Will the local wildlife literally drive your dog wild? Do you live in housing with noise restrictions? Do you have neighbors nearby?
The Lab has the reputation of being one of the most sweet-natured breeds, and it's well deserved. He's outgoing, eager to please, and friendly with both people and other animals. Aside from a winning personality, he has the intelligence and eagerness to please that make him easy to train. Training is definitely necessary because this breed has a lot of energy and exuberance. The working heritage of the Lab means he is active. This breed needs activity, both physical and mental, to keep him happy. There is some variation in the activity level of Labs: some are rowdy, others are more laid back. All thrive on activity.

From Marcy's foster mom – she’s an absolute sweetheart.  She was surrendered to a local shelter after getting out of the backyard with her dog buddy.  She hasn't tried to escape while with here with us.  I do think she was kept outside quite a bit so we’ve had some house training to do but we are making progress there.  We crate her at night and she goes in easily and is quiet all night.  Daisy is fine on walks and getting better each time.  She rides great in the car though I have the feeling she hasn’t had many car rides.       
My name is Misty and I'd like to tell you a little bit about myself.  I like to take walks, and I'm pretty good on the leash, except when it comes to squirrels. I think I can catch them but my dreams never come true.  I also love to play ball and will do that as long as you want.  I am very good in the house.  My foster mom is so happy with me because I don't get into anything. I don't mind going in the crate and I don't make a mess in there, either.  I have a foster brother here, and we get along just fine.  I ride well in the car and enjoy looking out the window. Most of all, I'm just a very loving and friendly girl who needs you to love me and take care of me forever.  I hope to meet you soon.
I keep a watching eye out for everything and am a really good alarm system, making sure everyone knows I am home! I love people visiting and snuggling up with everyone. Food, treats? Keep it coming!!! Yum Yum! Bath/Shower? NOOOO, thank you!! Swimming? Who knows, but it's really cold and I haven't tried that wet activity yet. I always thought water was just for drinking?

The sleek and easy-care Lab coat has two layers: a short, thick, straight topcoat, and a soft, weather-resistant undercoat. The two-layer coat protects him from the cold and wet, which helps him in his role as a retriever for hunters. The coat comes in three colors: chocolate, black, and yellow. Black was the favorite color among early breeders, but over the years, yellow and chocolate Labs have become popular. Some breeders have recently begun selling "rare" colored Labrador Retrievers, such as polar white or fox red. These shades aren't really rare — they're a variation of the yellow Lab.Grooming doesn't get much easier than with a Lab, but the breed does shed — a lot. Buy a quality vacuum cleaner and brush your dog daily, especially when he's shedding, to get out the loose hair. Labs need a bath about every two months or so to keep them looking clean and smelling good. Of course, if your Lab rolls in a mud puddle or something foul, which he's apt to do, it's fine to bathe him more often.Brush your Lab's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.Trim nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and prevent your legs from getting scratched when your Lab enthusiastically jumps up to greet you. His ears should be checked weekly for redness or a bad odor, which can indicate an infection. When you check your dog's ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Don't insert anything into the ear canal; just clean the outer ear. Because ear infections are common in Labs, also clean out the ears after bathing, swimming, or any time your dog gets wet. This helps prevent infection. Begin accustoming your Lab to being brushed and examined when he's a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you'll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he's an adult. As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.
**All dogs are individuals. Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual dog will behave. Dogs from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences, training on how to get along with kids, and personality. No matter what the breed or breed type, all dogs have strong jaws, sharp pointy teeth, and may bite in stressful circumstances. Young children and dogs of any breed should always be supervised by an adult and never left alone together, period.
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