Once known as the "St John's Dogs," the Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular breeds in the United States. The Lab is native to Newfoundland, where it worked side by side with fishermen catching fish that came loose from the lines and trained to jump into the icy waters to help pull in the nets. Specimens were brought to England in the 1800s by English ships coming from Labrador. The breed was crossed with setters, spaniels and other types of retrievers to improve its instincts as a hunter. The Labrador is highly trainable and is not only popular as a family companion but also excels in: hunting, tracking, retrieving, watchdog, police work, narcotics detection, guide for the blind, service dog for the disabled, search and rescue, sledding, carting, agility, field trial competitor and competitive obedience.


The high intelligence, initiative and self-direction of Labradors in working roles is exemplified by dogs such as Endal, who is trained to, if need be, put his wheelchair-bound human in the recovery position, cover him with a blanket, and activate an emergency phone.[59] A number of Labradors have also been taught to assist their owner in removing money and credit cards from ATMs with prior training.[60]
Once fetch begins, when it ends isn’t really up to you. With this automated tosser, it can go on as long as your pup wants; she just has to drop the ball in the bucket and watch it launch out the other end. You can even adjust its throwing power to keep the ball-throwing to an inside distance. There’s a model that throws standard tennis balls, and one for small pups that tosses miniature ones.

The Cleverpet is the worlds first game console for dogs – and utilizes a series of lights and sensors to dispense treats based upon your dogs interactions. It works by guiding your dog through a series of increasingly difficult challenges in order to earn rewards. The device even pairs with a mobile app so that you can see when your dog is playing while you aren’t there – or even limit the amount of treats it will dispense!
In the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the Labrador's breed club have set the breed standard to accommodate the field-bred Labrador somewhat. For instance, the AKC withers-height standards allow conformation dogs to be slightly taller than the equivalent British standard.[45] However, dual champions, or dogs that excel in both the field and the show ring, are becoming more unusual.[46]
Dog brothers and sisters are great and I get along nicely with my furry siblings, but I want your attention first! I am strong enough to gentle squeeze in-between you and the dog sibling. Little children? As mentioned, I am very good and sweet, but a big boy like me might knock the little ones over in my excitement - of course by accident!  So, if you have small children, they need to be understanding and good with big dogs that get a little excited from time to time.  As far as cats go.... I haven't met one in person so that is a little of an unknown.
"This is my puppy Bauer at 3 months old. He is a purebred yellow Labrador Retriever from Heather Hollow Farm Labradors in Hardwick, VT. He likes to sleep a lot and play tug-of-war. He also likes to dig up the yard which mommy and daddy aren't too happy about :-). He loves walks and playing with other dogs. He's a very smart pup and learns very fast. He's practically potty trained—we use the ring the bell on the door system—and he sleeps through the night. He LOVES his crate and will go in by himself when he needs some alone time. He also likes to cuddle on your lap, which could pose a problem when he's 80 lbs. one day :-)"
Twinkle is a super sweet, handsome boy with all the traits of a great family Labrador. A gently giant (around 85 pounds), he is my constant companion and loves to hang out with people all day (just in case you have a treat, or willing to give him a pet). He is housetrained and has learned basic commands (sit, off) and walk well on a leash. Twinkle likes to cuddle, is very affectionate and gets along well with other dogs.  Did I mention he really likes affection and getting belly rubs…
The lovable Lab needs to be around his family, and is definitely not a backyard dog. If he's left alone for too long, he'll probably tarnish his saintly reputation: A lonely, bored Lab is apt to dig, chew, or find other destructive outlets for his energy. Labs show some variation in their activity levels, but all of them need activity, both physical and mental. Daily 30-minute walks, a romp at the dog park, or a game of fetch, are a few ways to help your Lab burn off energy. However, a puppy should not be taken for too long walks and should play for a few minutes at a time. Labrador Retrievers are considered "workaholics," and will exhaust themselves. It is up to you to end play and training sessions. Labs have such good reputations that some owners think they don't need training. That's a big mistake. Without training, a rambunctious Lab puppy will soon grow to be a very large, rowdy dog. Luckily, Labs take to training well — in fact, they often excel in obedience competitions. Start with puppy kindergarten, which not only teaches your pup good canine manners, but helps him learn how to be comfortable around other dogs and people. Look for a class that uses positive training methods that reward the dog for getting it right, rather than punishing him for getting it wrong. You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Lab puppy. Don't let your Lab puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement until he's at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility, with its one-inch jumps. Like all retrievers, the Lab is mouthy, and he's happiest when he has something, anything, to carry in his mouth. He's also a chewer, so be sure to keep sturdy toys available all the time — unless you want your couch chewed up. And when you leave the house, it's wise to keep your Lab in a crate or kennel so he's can't get himself into trouble chewing things he shouldn't.
The Labrador’s hindquarters are broad, muscular and well-developed from the hip to the hock with well-turned stifles and strong short hocks. Viewed from the rear, the hind legs are straight and parallel. Viewed from the side, the angulation of the rear legs is in balance with the front. The hind legs are strongly boned, muscled with moderate angulation at the stifle, and powerful, clearly defined thighs. The stifle is strong and there is no slippage of the patellae while in motion or when standing. The hock joints are strong, well let down and do not slip or hyper-extend while in motion or when standing. Angulation of both stifle and hock joint is such as to achieve the optimal balance of drive and traction. When standing the rear toes are only slightly behind the point of the rump.
Lumpkins is super smart and has excellent manners. He knows how to sit, shake, and lay down and does not counter surf. He is also happy to share and when he may occasionally look to steal toys from our other dogs mouth, a quick no and he will stop trying. He knows where to do his business, is not a runner or an escape artist and quickly comes when his name is called.  Lumpkins is also good with children but as he is still young would probably do best with older kids given his energy/play level.
A cozy pair of slippers makes an excellent dog gift for dog moms who have plenty of cold floors throughout their house. Keep their toes toasty with a pair of cute pooch slippers like the Fuzzy Nation Dog Breed Slippers from GreaterGood's Animal Rescue Site. These slippers feature a warm faux fur lining, corduroy exterior and stuffed doggy head embellishments. Your dog mama will also enjoy knowing that her slippers helped feed shelter animals.
Batti cinque!!!!!🐶🤪🤪🤪🐶🐶👍👍 . . . . . #labrador_pictures #labradora #labradores #labradoroftheday #labrador_ #labrador_retriver #labradore #labrador_cute #labradoretriver #labradorlife #labradorofficial #labradorretriver #labradorlovers #labrador__retriver #labradordog #marleyhoneylabrador #labrador_daily_no1 . . . . @labrador___retriever @labrador.love @labradornation.secrets @loverslab1 @labrador.everyday @labrador_love_insta @lovinglabrador @letslovelabradors @labradors_ @bestoflabradors
I’m so happy you clicked on my profile!  My rescue name is Marcy.  I’m an Aries dog so I like things to be about me but I’ll let you in on the fun!  Do you like walks?  Me too!  Do you like throwing a ball?  I love bringing it back!  I’m a really fast runner which frustrates my dog sibling because I always catch her.  Tag!  You’re it!  I love to eat, too.  Do you?  I helped myself to a piece of cheesecake on the counter during Christmas.  It was so good!  What do you think about squirrels?  I can’t stand them and do my best to keep them out of the yard and try to jump up to the top of the fence to get them.  I take defending the yard very seriously.  My foster family has 3 cats and we’re all pretty chill together…unless one of them runs then they look like a squirrel so I chase them, too.   Gotta go!  There’s popcorn and CSI in the living room!!
Labrador retriver je rasa psa koja potiče iz Kanade, sa ostrva Njufaundlend. Zahvaljujući grofu od Malmesburija, koji je 1887. godine sa sobom iz Kanade u Englesku doveo i pse, ovi požrtvovani psi dobili su ime po poluostrvu Labrador, koje se nalazi u blizini Njufaundlenda. Poreklo labradora, kao i niza drugih rasa poput današnjeg njufaundlenda i zlatnog retrivera, vezuje se za pse Sv. Džona, rasu radnih pasa korišćenih u ribolovu. Za razliku od današnjeg labradora, pas Sv. Džona isključivo je crne boje, sa belom dlakom na grudima i šapama. Ova rasa se danas smatra izumrlom, iako su u Kanadi do skoro zabeleženi pokušaji njenog održanja. Labrador je od svog pretka nasledio inteligenciju, požrtvovanost i izuzetne plivačke sposobnosti. Kao i njegov predak, labrador je prvobitno uzgajan kao pas za vodu i pomoć pri ribolovu. U 19. veku korišćen je za donošenje divljači, budući da poseduje izuzetan prirodni nagon za ovu aktivnost i da ga je veoma lako obučiti. Iako se prvi opisi labradora pojavljuju još u prvim decenijama 19. veka, od 1870. godine, širenjem rase u Englesku dolazi do razvoja njene popularnosti. Engleski kinološki klub prepoznao je rasu 1903. godine, dok je prva registracija u američkom kinološkom klubu zabeležena 1917. Prvi zapisi o žutom labradoru datiraju iz 1899, a tridesetih godina 20. veka pojavljuju se i labradori boje čokolade. Danas, labradori su izuzetno pouzdani vodiči slepih osoba, policijski psi za detektovanje droge i svakako jedna od najomiljenijih rasa porodičnih pasa. U 2004. godini u kinološkim društvima registrovano je preko 145 hiljada pasa ove rase. Čuvena engleska rok grupa Led Zeppelin, 1971. godine objavila je pesmu "Black dog". Iako pesma uopšte ne govori o psima, naziv je dobila po crnom labradoru, koji je boravio u studiju tokom njenog snimanja. Za labradore su vezane i neke od najčudnijih priča iz života. Jedna od priča datira iz 1924. godine, kada je u Pensilvaniji, labrador po imenu Pep osuđen na kaznu doživotnog zatvora bez mogućnosti pomilovanja zato što je, po nekim tvrdnjama, ubio mačku guvernerove žene, dok je po drugoj verziji poslat u zatvor zato što je imao izrazitu sklonost ka žvakanju guvernerovih jatučića. Treća, humanija verzija priče upućuje na činjenicu da je pas poslat u zatvor u nekoj vrsti programa socijalizacije zatvorenika. Labrador po imenu Bosko, je 1981, godine proglašen za počasnog gradonačelnika oblasti Sunol u Kaliforniji. 
In the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the Labrador's breed club have set the breed standard to accommodate the field-bred Labrador somewhat. For instance, the AKC withers-height standards allow conformation dogs to be slightly taller than the equivalent British standard.[45] However, dual champions, or dogs that excel in both the field and the show ring, are becoming more unusual.[46]
There are two types of Labradors, the English Labrador and the American Labrador. The English bred Lab comes from English bred stock. Its general appearance is different than the American bred Lab. The English bred Labs are heavier, thicker and blockier. The American bred Lab comes from American bred stock and is tall and lanky. The double coat is smooth and does not have any waves. Coat colors come in solid black, yellow or chocolate. There is also said to be a rare silver or gray color that is referred to by the AKC as a shade of chocolate. This color is controversial and some claim it is a Weimaraner cross, while others say it is a true mutation. The head of the Labrador is broad with a moderate stop. The nose is thick, black on black and yellow dogs and brown on chocolate dogs. The nose color often fades and is not considered a fault in the show ring. The teeth should meet in a scissors or level bite. The muzzle is fairly wide. The neck is proportionately wide and powerful. The body is slightly longer than tall. The short, hard coat is easy to care for and water-resistant. The medium-sized eyes are set well apart. Eye color should be brown in yellow and black dogs and hazel or brown in chocolate dogs. Some Labs can also have green or greenish-yellow eyes. In silver dogs the eye color is usually gray. The eye rims are black in yellow and black dogs and brown in chocolate dogs. The ears are medium in size, hanging down and pendant in shape. The otter tail is thick at the base, gradually tapering towards the tip. It is completely covered with short hair, with no feathering. The feet are strong and compact with webbed feet which aid the dog in swimming.
en Well, I figure with her being ridiculously book- smart to the point where she has almost no interpersonal skills, and you being warm and cuddly as an un- potty trained labradoodle... and about as useful in high- stress medical situations as an un- potty trained labradoodle... _ together _ the two of you make one barely passable doctor... slash labradoodle
OK, so maybe you’ll never get fully in your dog’s head, but you can at least see the world through her eyes. Drop your GoPro in the Fetch mount, strap the harness around their midsection, and you’ll get to see what it’s like to be on the other end of the tug-of-war or in full romp on the beach. It’s the next best thing to knowing what in the world they’re smelling on the sidewalk.
The Cleverpet is the worlds first game console for dogs – and utilizes a series of lights and sensors to dispense treats based upon your dogs interactions. It works by guiding your dog through a series of increasingly difficult challenges in order to earn rewards. The device even pairs with a mobile app so that you can see when your dog is playing while you aren’t there – or even limit the amount of treats it will dispense!
Labs are famously friendly. They are companionable housemates who bond with the whole family, and they socialize well with neighbor dogs and humans alike. But don’t mistake his easygoing personality for low energy: The Lab is an enthusiastic athlete that requires lots of exercise, like swimming and marathon games of fetch, to keep physically and mentally fit.
en That portion of the sub-area lying between the coast of Newfoundland from Cape Bauld to Cape Ray and a line described as follows: beginning at Cape Bauld, thence due north to the parallel of 52°15′ north latitude, thence due west to the Labrador coast, thence along the Labrador coast to the terminus of the Labrador-Quebec boundary, thence along a rhumb line in a south-westerly direction to a point at 49°25′ north latitude, 60°00′ west longitude, thence due south to a point at 47°50′ north latitude, 60°00′ west longitude, thence along a rhumb line in a south-easterly direction to the point at which the boundary of sub-area 3 intersects the straight line joining Cape North, Nova Scotia with Cape Ray, Newfoundland, thence to Cape Ray, Newfoundland.
OFA Hips: Good. OFA Elbows: Normal. OFA Congenital Cardiac: Clear. CERF: Clear. Optigen prcd-PRA : Clear. EIC: Clear. CNM: Clear. Narcolepsy (NARC): Clear. “Cadence" is son of HRCH Doubleplay Legacy's Reign “Bond,” JH, CGC and grandson of Canadian/Am/International CH Balcroft Silonas Time to Reign (recently featured in the Labrador Quarterly). He is also grandson of 3xGRHRCH Legacy's Atchafalaya Nightmare “Gator” JH.
In the United States, the breed gained wider recognition following a 1928 American Kennel Gazette article, "Meet the Labrador Retriever". Before this time, the AKC had only registered 23 Labradors in the country,[21] in part because US and UK hunting styles had different requirements.[74] Labradors acquired popularity as hunting dogs during the 1920s and especially after World War II, as they gained recognition as combining some of the best traits of the two favourite United States breeds as both game finders and water dogs.[74]

The Labrador Retriever should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

The Labrador should be short-coupled, with good spring of ribs tapering to a moderately wide chest. The Labrador should not be narrow chested; giving the appearance of hollowness between the front legs, nor should it have a wide spreading, bulldog-like front. Correct chest conformation will result in tapering between the front legs that allows unrestricted forelimb movement. Chest breadth that is either too wide or too narrow for efficient movement and stamina is incorrect. Slab-sided individuals are not typical of the breed; equally objectionable are rotund or barrel chested specimens. The underline is almost straight, with little or no tuck-up in mature animals. Loins should be short, wide and strong; extending to well developed, powerful hindquarters. When viewed from the side, the Labrador Retriever shows a well-developed, but not exaggerated forechest.
Few breeds so richly deserve their popularity as does the Labrador Retriever. When trained, the breed is obedient and amiable, and tolerates the antics of children, other dogs, and other pets. The Lab is a calm house dog, playful yard dog, and intense field dog, all on the same day. Labs are eager to please, enjoyslearning, and excel in obedience. It is a powerful breed that loves to swim and retrieve. Labradors needs daily physical and mental challenges to keep occupied. A bored Lab can get into trouble! The Labrador’s hunting instinct can drive a dog to roam, so training and a safe yard are needed.
The first St. John's dog was said to be brought to England in or around 1820, but the breed's reputation had already spread to England; there is a story that the 2nd Earl of Malmesbury saw a St. John's dog on a fishing boat and immediately made arrangements with traders to have some of these dogs imported to England. These ancestors of the first labradors so impressed the Earl with their skill and ability for retrieving anything within the water and on shore that he devoted his entire kennel to developing and stabilising the breed.[18]

Kate Perry, dog trainer and author of Training for Both Ends of the Dog Leash, likes to give “practical items that help stimulate the dogs mind and help owners have a better relationship with their dogs.” One of her favorite interactive treat toys for pups is the Busy Buddy Twist and Treat, which keeps dogs working for their food. “Great as a gift for new dog owners, and great for training a dog to work for their food.”

Lumpkins is super smart and has excellent manners. He knows how to sit, shake, and lay down and does not counter surf. He is also happy to share and when he may occasionally look to steal toys from our other dogs mouth, a quick no and he will stop trying. He knows where to do his business, is not a runner or an escape artist and quickly comes when his name is called.  Lumpkins is also good with children but as he is still young would probably do best with older kids given his energy/play level.

OFA Excellent. CERF: Clear. Optigen prcd-PRA: Clear. EIC: Clear. CNM: Clear. OFA Congenital Cardiac: Clear (by color Doppler Echocardiogram). “Boots” is daughter of CH Mandigo’s Doubleplay Millennium JH “Deuce”, & Kerrybrook’s Midnight Rider. She is also granddaughter of Am.CH & HRCH Fairview Panache by Mandigo, who is son of CH Franklin’s Golden Mandigo CD through 25-year frozen semen.


Does the dog mama in your life constantly do everything she can to make her furbaby healthier, happier and live a lot longer? Get her "Dog Obsessed: The Honest Kitchen's Complete Guide to a Happier, Healthier Life for the Pup You Love," by Lucy Postins. This handy guide features more than50 easy recipes for dog treats and meals, and it also includes health tips, advice and dashes of humor. This book also includes a section about holiday health and safety for dogs – perfect for the season. 

The AKC describes the Labrador's temperament as a kind, pleasant, outgoing and tractable nature.[5] Labradors' sense of smell allows them to home in on almost any scent and follow the path of its origin. They generally stay on the scent until they find it. Navies, military forces and police forces use them as detection dogs to track down smugglers, thieves, terrorists and black marketers. They are known to have a very soft feel to the mouth, as a result of being bred to retrieve game such as waterfowl. They are prone to chewing objects (though they can be trained to abandon this behaviour).


One of the most popular breeds in the USA, the Labrador Retriever is loyal, loving, affectionate and patient, making a great family dog. Highly intelligent, good-natured, very willing and eager to please, it is among the top choices for service dog work. Labs love to play, especially in water, never wanting to pass up the opportunity for a good swim. These lively dogs have an excellent, reliable temperament and are friendly, superb with children and equable with other dogs. They crave human leadership and need to feel as though they are part of the family. Labs are easily trained. Some may be reserved with strangers unless very well socialized, preferably while they are still puppies. Adult Labs are very strong; train them while they are puppies to heel on the leash, and not to bolt out doorways and gateways before the humans. These dogs are watchdogs, not guard dogs, although some have been known to guard. They can become destructive if the humans are not 100% pack leader and/or if they do not receive enough mental and physical exercise, and left too much to their own devices. Show lines are generally heavier and easier going than field lines. Field lines tend to be very energetic and will easily become high strung without enough exercise. Labs bred from English lines (English Labs) are more calm and laid back than Labradors bred from American lines. English Labs mature quicker than the American type.

A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: he strains on the leash (until you train him not to), tries to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life.

The Lab’s thick, tapering tail—an “otter tail,” it’s called— serves as a powerful rudder, constantly moving back and forth as the dog swims and aids the dog in turning. As for the breed’s characteristic temperament, it is as much a hallmark of the breed as the otter tail. “The ideal disposition is one of a kindly, outgoing, tractable nature; eager to please and nonagressive towards man or animal,” the breed standard says. “The Labrador has much that appeals to people; his gentle ways, intelligence and adaptability make him an ideal dog.” When defining a Lab’s primary attributes, the most important might be temperament since his utility depends on his disposition. “If a dog does not possess true breed temperament,” wrote a noted dog judge, “he is not a Labrador.”
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