Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise -- especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, such as herding or hunting. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility.
An early report by a Colonel Hawker described the dog as "by far the best for any kind of shooting. He is generally black and no bigger than a Pointer, very fine in legs, with short, smooth hair and does not carry his tail so much curled as the other; is extremely quick, running, swimming and fighting....and their sense of smell is hardly to be credited...."[17]

From Marcy's foster mom – she’s an absolute sweetheart.  She was surrendered to a local shelter after getting out of the backyard with her dog buddy.  She hasn't tried to escape while with here with us.  I do think she was kept outside quite a bit so we’ve had some house training to do but we are making progress there.  We crate her at night and she goes in easily and is quiet all night.  Daisy is fine on walks and getting better each time.  She rides great in the car though I have the feeling she hasn’t had many car rides.       
Jack Vanderwyk traces the origins of all Chocolate Labradors listed on the LabradorNet database (some 34,000 Labrador dogs of all shades) to eight original bloodlines. However, the shade was not seen as a distinct colour until the 20th century; before then, according to Vanderwyk, such dogs can be traced but were not registered. A degree of crossbreeding with Flatcoat or Chesapeake Bay retrievers was also documented in the early 20th century, prior to recognition. Chocolate Labradors were also well established in the early 20th century at the kennels of the Earl of Feversham, and Lady Ward of Chiltonfoliat.[27]
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I love loove looove attention!!! I am a really good boy and give lots of kisses. I don’t destroy anything, haven’t been caught countertop surfing, sleep in my crate and now even in my own bed beside my foster parents bed. I occasionally try to sneak into bed with them, but they tell me I have to sleep in my own bed, so I lay down there. However, the teenager girls in the house let me cuddle up in bed with themand that's pretty good. I can be left alone in the house and with my dog siblings, even though I would go into my crate.


"Joy" is daughter of Int’l CH Doubleplay’s Cadence HaKelev “Cadence” and HaDassah Nashette of Mandigo. She’s a granddaughter of HRCH Doubleplay Legacy’s Reign “Bond” JH, CGC and Am.CH & HRCH Fairview Panache by Mandigo, and great-granddaughter of Canadian/Am/International CH Balcroft Silonas Time to Reign , 3xGRHRCH Legacy's Atchafalaya Nightmare JH, and BISS. Ch. Am. Can. Mex. ’78 World & Int. Ch. Franklin’s Golden Mandigo CD AWC “Mandigo” (through 25-year frozen semen).
Looking for dog gift inspiration? Based on our readers’ favorite picks over the course of the year, we selected a few top trending dog gifts for 2018. These choices run the gamut from magnets to mugs to some very unique options for the dog lover that has it all. (Dog tarot, anyone?) If those don’t strike your fancy, keep scrolling for links to breed-specific gift guides and much more.
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